Category Archives: Art

“Spaghetti western ‘The Last Plot in Revenge’ comes with spaghetti”

Spaghetti western 'The Last Plot in Revenge' comes with spaghetti

From 2013, but still fun . . .

The weirdos of Philadelphia theater – and we mean that with the utmost respect and admiration – are at it again. Brat Productions is putting on “The Last Plot in Revenge,” a spaghetti western with characters dueling over the one remaining cemetery plot in the town of Revenge, Montana. The genre-bending musical-and-dinner-theater combo was written by local playwright Brian Grace-Duff and directed by John Clancy, the Obie Award winner who founded New York City Fringe. It promises blood, grit, and a blurred line of reality.

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Jandê Saavedra Farias Short “Lindonéia – Western Comics”

Art and animation for the comic book sequences in the short film “Lindonéia” by Tainá Vital and Raquel Gandra. Inspired by old italian Tex comics.

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Interesting lecture by Martin Mystère on Italian Comics and the Western Genre

tex-willer

AMERICA ON MY MIND: Italian Comics and the Industry of Imagination

Looking down through this lecture, I noticed this very interesting paragraph:

Europeans never got tired of Western comics as has happened in the U.S.; Italy, in particular, produces the world’s best-selling Western strip, Tex (500,000 copies monthly). Here again, the explaination is simple: we tend to want (and to mythicize) what we don’t own, and in Europe there is nothing comparable to the Western epics. Reciprocally, popular American literature swarms with barbarians, knights, dragons and magicians: a genre, Sword and Sorcery, that has never taken root on the Old Continent, where the Middle Ages and epic-chivalric literature have existed (and are considered by many young European readers as boring “school subjects”).

 

There is some more interesting info in this lecture. Enjoy!

 

Locandina_Tex_2

 

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More Spaghetti Western Comics “Marvel Tries To Revive the Western… With a Side of Spaghetti”

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Once Upon A Time In The West In Comics  had a nice blog post about Spaghetti western inspired comic books from the 1970s, including an entire story about Caleb Hammer.

During the 1970’s, DC had unleashed a string of Western comics that drew from the spirit of the Italian western films. Although they also reprinted earlier stories of heroes like Pow-Wow Smith and Johnny Thunder, they had introduced more contemporary charcters like Jonah Hex, Scalphunter and Bat Lash.

Marvel, on the other hand, had produced a nearly endless string of reprints of Kid Colt, Rawhide Kid, Two-Gun Kid and Outlaw Kid. Their new Western comics were usually a new story featuring one of their old, Atlas heroes backed up by reprints of their old, Atlas heroes. They introduced Red Wolf, but his adventures were formulaic, and very similar to Atlas’ Apache Kid.

In 1980, Marvel tried to introduce a new style of Western hero. Well, new to Marvel. Caleb Hammer has the look and feel of an Italian Western. Caleb bears more than a passing resemblance to a certain high plains Drifter. And, if it reminds you a little bit of a DC Western from 10 years before, it may be because it was inked by Tony DeZuniga, the original artist on DC’s Jonah Hex.

From 1980’s Marvel Premiere #54, we have “The Coming of Caleb Hammer” by Peter B. Gillis, pencilled by Gene Day and inked by Tony DeZuniga.

 

This earlier post contains an entire early Jonah Hex story:

The recurring heroes in Western comics were traditionally cut from heroic cloth. Guys like Red Ryder, The Lemonade Kid, NightHawk… Maybe some of them wore masks, but they weren’t outlaws or bandits, just guys with secret identities. And even the guys who were “outlaws” were never really bad. Guys like The Rawhide Kid, Kid Colt, The Outlaw Kid, the Two-Gun Kid (Weren’t there any grown-ups in the West?) were branded as outlaws, but they were all falsely accused.

Sure, there were a few misfits, mostly Indians or “half-breed” characters who weren’t accepted by the folks they tried to help. But the reader knew about their troubled, noble hearts and so that was okay.

This approach lasted from the Golden Age of the late 30’s all the way through the 1960’s. And then, in 1971, a new type of hero began to surface in the fabric of American Western comics. The ANTI-hero. What’s an anti-hero?

“In fiction, an antihero is generally considered to be a protagonist whose character is at least in some regards conspicuously contrary to that of thearchetypal hero, and is in some instances its antithesis.” – Wikipedia

Jonah Hex is not a typical hero. He is not handsome (although he may have been once). He is not noble (He kills men for money). Jonah Hex is a horribly disfigured Confederate veteran who makes his living as a bounty hunter. And he’s mean. Plumb, mad-dog mean.

Enjoy his debut in All-Star Western #10, “Welcome to Paradise”

 

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Cool Italian western inspired short ‘Malaria’ by Edison Oda

Learned about this at a post by Robo Panda at UPROXX. Here is the Panda’s description:

 

Any time you can combine Spaghetti Western sensibility with graphic novelization and the Grim Reaper — and you can keep the whole thing under six minutes — I’m totally there. Edson Oda and friends accomplished this with “Malaria”, a short film about a hitman hired to kill Death to save a little girl from malaria. Oda combined Origami, Kirigami, Time lapse, nankin illustration, props, comics, Western movie tropes, and even fire into one seemingly-continuous shot that feels like an animated motion comic while being much more enthralling because the pages are real and the artists’ hands can be seen.

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CinemaRetro “FOOD ARTIST CARL WARNER’S TRIBUTE TO “THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE UGLY”- A LITERAL “SPAGHETTI” WESTERN”

Here:

To celebrate the UK Blu-ray release of The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, food artist Carl Warner has fashioned a unique tribute to the film made entirely from pasta! We’ll admit it looks magnificent, Carl– but we’re still waiting for that King Kong tribute made from bananas. Here is the official press release:

World renowned food artist Carl Warner has produced his culinary interpretation of the classic ‘Spaghetti Western’ film trilogy, made entirely from spaghetti and other Italian ingredients.

In his film foodscape debut, Warner has brought Sergio Leone’s masterpiece The Good, The Bad and The Ugly to life using traditional Italian ingredients from pasta to pancetta, to celebrate the re-mastered Blu-ray release of the and to mark the 90th Anniversary of the studio MGM

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